I wrote this chapter because homeless in my home city of Oxford had become not just a local crisis, worse than it had ever been, but also part of the national scandal.

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Where have we come from?
Unemployment has not always been with us. In fact, the term was hardly used at all before 1900,

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On the 25th of November 2020 the Chancellor of the Exchequer decided that, in the public sector, there would be no increase at all for many and a real-terms pay-cut for millions more in 2021.

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For the third of society who live within a few miles of their parents, not seeing relatives at Christmas will make little sense if you see them most weeks anyway.

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UK chancellor Rishi Sunak plans to set up a national infrastructure bank to “channel billions of pounds into capital projects”

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An article published in the Conversation, 2 December 2020

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It’s social, not medical, science that tells us most about the disparate spread of this pandemic.

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Danny Dorling discusses recent findings from a major study of mortality across UK countries and cities, and highlights unprecedented worsening mortality among the UK’s poorest communities:

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In 1890, when he was still at school in Harrow, Winston Churchill wrote a poem

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As Eva Gómez-Jiménez and Michael Toolan explain in the Introduction to this book, high economic inequality has,

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In 1968, at the height of the last great influenza pandemic, at least a million people worldwide died

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In the week after the schools went back in England and Wales, an extra 538 people died (77 a day).

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Growing alarm has been expressed over the rising numbers of people who are testing positive for COVID-19 in the UK.

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Long before the 2020 pandemic swept the world, almost everything was already slowing down.

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It is a conundrum. For much of the past two months, many people have been convinced that mortality associated with COVID-19 would rise as the number of people testing positive with the disease increased. But this has not happened so far.

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